Friday, December 24, 2010

2012 Aprilia Tuono V4R Review,Feature,Spec,Buy

2012 Aprilia Tuono V4R Review,Feature,Spec,Buy
Next to the RS4, Aprilia also brought the Tuono V4 R supersports bike to the EICMA Show. The new bike features a new exhaust system with bypass valve, which is two kilos lighter than the system used on the RSV4 R and is powered by a V4 65° engine framed by the brushed aluminum elements.

One special feature of the new Tuono V4 R is the APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) joystick, the second generation electronic dynamics control package developed by Aprilia to get as close as possible to the physical limits of riding. APRC is based on an automotive inertia sensor platform, with two gyrometers and two accelerometers allowing the ECU to determine the dynamic state of the motorcycle and control engine torque accordingly to help the rider exploit the full performance potential of the bike in all conditions.

Now comes the APRC SE version to sweeten the RSV4 Factory pot with the addition of traction control, wheelie control, launch control and a quick shifter, which you can find out more from our Euro correspondent’s First Ride review. Aprilia went and made one of our favorite literbikes of all time even better! It will retail for $22,499 when it arrives on our shores mid-2011. And if you really have extra coin burning a hole in your pocket and you must ride like Max, Aprilia offers a WSBK-spec, 200 hp race-ready Biaggi Replica for the paltry sum of $64,000.

Yet it’s the new Tuono V4R that really gets out blood pumping. The previous version with its liter-sized V-Twin is one of our all-time favorite nakeds, with a composed chassis, edgy Italian styling, and all-day-comfy ergos. Aprilia has now graced the Tuono with a retuned version of the compact but potent V-4 powering the RSV4, rated at an exciting 162 crankshaft horsepower. The V4R Tuono will also be available with the APRC (Aprilia Performance Ride Control) package that uses gyros and accelerometers to control traction, wheelies and launches.

2012 Aprilia Tuono V4R Specs

Engine: 999cc liquid-cooled V-Four, 16-valve DOHC
Bore x Stroke: 78.0 x 52.3mm
Compression Ratio: 13:1
Fuel Delivery: Fuel-injection
Clutch: Cable actuated wet multi-plate ramp-style slipper
Transmission: 6-speed
Final Drive: Chain
Frame: Twin-spar aluminum
Front Suspension: Showa 43mm inverted fork, 3-way adjustable for spring preload, compression and rebound damping; 4.72 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Sachs gas charged shock absorber, 3-way adjustable for spring preload, compression and rebound damping; 5.11 in. travel
Front Brakes: 320mm discs with Brembo monobloc 4-piston radial-mount calipers; radial-pump master cylinder, stainless-steel lines
Rear Brake: 220mm disc with Brembo twin-piston caliper
Front Wheel: 3-spoke cast aluminum 17 x 3.5-in.
Rear Wheel: 3-spoke cast aluminum 17 x 6.0-in.
Dry Weight: 394 pounds (claimed)
Wheelbase: 55.9 in. (1420mm)
Length: 80.3 in. (2040mm)
Rake: 25.0 deg. Trail: 107.5mm
Seat Height: 33.1 in. (840mm)
Fuel Capacity: 4.49 gal. (17 liters)
MSRP: TBD
Colors: TBD
Warranty: Two years, unlimited mileage

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT650 FI-SPORT 2011

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT650 FI-SPORT 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT650 FI-
SPORT BLACk

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT650 FI-SPORT 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT650 FI-
SPORT REAR RIGHT


MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT650 FI-SPORT 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT650 FI-
SPORT RED


MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT650 FI-SPORT 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT650 FI-
SPORT RIGHT FRONT


MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT650 FI-SPORT 2011, NEW, MODELS, SPECIFICATION, COLORS, CHASSIS, ENGINE.
Chassis Overall Length 82.3in
Overall Height 43.9in
Overall Width 30.9in
Wheel Base 56.5in
Ground Clearance 7.3in
Seat Height 32.7in
Brake (Front) F: 300Ø Semi Floating double discs, 4 pistons calipers
Brake (Rear) R: 230Ø Single disc, 2 pistons caliper
Suspension (Front) F: 41Ø Upside down Telescopic (Compression, Rebound damping adjustable)
Suspension (Rear) R: Swing arm with Progressive linkage Hydraulic Mono shock absorber (Preload adjustable)
Rake/Trail 25 degrees / 3.1 inches
Tire F: 120/60 ZR-17 55W / R: 160/60 ZR-17 69W
Fuel Tank Capacity 4.5gal
Wet Weight 459lbs
GVWR 838lbs

Engine Type Liquid cooled 90° V-twin DOHC, 4-valve per cylinder
Displacement 647cc
Bore x Stroke 81.5 x 62
Compression Ratio 11.6 : 1
Fuel System Fuel injection
Lubrication Wet sump
Transmission Clutch Wet, Multiplate
Gear Constant mesh 6-speed (1down 5up)
Final Drive Chain

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG MS3-250-SCOOTER 2011

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG MS3-250-SCOOTER 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG MS3-250-
SCOOTER GRAY

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG MS3-250-SCOOTER 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG MS3-250-
SCOOTER BLACK

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG MS3-250-SCOOTER 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG MS3-250-
SCOOTER ROAD SHOW

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG MS3-250-SCOOTER 2011, NEW, MODELS, SPECIFICATION, COLORS, CHASSIS, ENGINE.

Chassis Overall Length (inch) 83.5
Overall Height (inch) 53.7
Overall Width (inch) 30.1
Wheel Base (inch) 59.1
Ground Clearance
(inch) 4.7
Seat Height (inch) 29.5
Brake (Front) 240Ø Double discs, 2 pistons calipers
Brake (Rear) 220Ø Single disc, 2 pistons caliper (CBS)
Suspension (Front) Conventional Telescopic
Suspension (Rear) Double Shock Absorber
Tire (Front) 120/70 -13 53S
Tire (Rear) 140/60 -14 64S
Fuel Tank Capacity (gal) 2.08
Dry Mass 341 lbs

Engine Type Liquid cooled Single cylinder DOHC, 4-valve per cylinder
Displacement (cc) 249
Bore x Stroke 73 x 59.6
Compression Ratio 12 : 1
Max Power 25HP @ 8500 RPM
Max Torque 16.39 lb/ft @ 6900 RPM
Fuel System Fuel Injection
Lubrication Wet sump

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG ST7-CRUISER 2011

 MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG ST7-CRUISER 2011 MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG ST7-
CRUISER BLACK

 MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG ST7-CRUISER 2011
MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG ST7-
CRUISER RIGHT SIDE
 MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG ST7-CRUISER 2011 MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG ST7-
CRUISER LEFT SIDE

 MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG ST7-CRUISER 2011 MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG ST7-
CRUISER FRONT RIGHT

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG ST7-CRUISER 2011, NEW, MODELS, SPECIFICATION, COLORS, CHASSIS, ENGINE.
Engine Type Liquid cooled 90° V-twin DOHC, 4-valve per cylinder
Displacement 678.2cc
Bore X Stroke 3.21 in x 2.56 in
Compression Ratio 11.5 : 1
Fuel System Fuel injection
Transmission Clutch Wet, Multi plate
Gear Constant mesh, 5 Speed
Final Drive Belt

Chassis Overall Length 97.24in
Overall Width 37.8in
Overall Height 44.69in
Wheelbase 65.94in
Ground Clearance 6.1in
Seat Height 27.17in
Rake Angle 33°
Trail 5.59in
Dry Weight 229 kg (505 lbs)
Wet Weight 244 kg (538 lbs)
G.V.W.R. 415 kg (915 lbs)
Fuel Tank Capacity 4.75gal
Tire (Front) 120/80 - 16 60H
Tire (Rear) 170/80 - 15 77H
Brake (Front) Hydraulic 4 piston caliper, 300Ø Floating Single disk
Brake (Rear) Hydraulic pin slide 2 piston caliper, 270Ø Single disk
Suspension (Front) 41Ø Conventional telescopic
Suspension (Rear) Swing arm, Hydraulic double shock absorber (preload adjustable)
Color Black, Red, White

Christmas Boots and Other Memorable Gifts

Last Christmas, I wrote a post on new Christmas boots, both the ones I'd anticipated and the ones I received, preceded by a long preamble reaching back to my childhood. Writing the post reminded me of a long-ago pair of boots and their contribution to my attitude on money management. The story of those once-upon-a-time boots is an important corrective to any impression my earlier preamble might have given that frugality in my childhood was stinginess. (If you haven't read those earlier posts, you might not know that I'm the eldest in a family of twelve, so frugality was a daily necessity, often an art.) In fact, as much as I remember having to account for money spent as a child and teen, as much as I remember returning pop bottles for cash and berry-picking to buy a family rowboat, as much as I remember mixing up milk powder when I would have preferred "store milk," I also remember my dad saying that if there was ever anything we really, really wanted, we should tell him, because he'd try to find a way to get it for us.

And I remember once that he really did.

So here's my "other boot story." I began writing it last year, then in the New Year's busy-ness didn't finish it. You can decide whether it was worth the wait:

When I was 17, graduated from high school, and driving my little '67 Sunbeam Imp (bought with money I'd earned from part-time work, supplemented by a small loan I repaid my parents) back and forth to UBC, every penny counted. A scholarship paid my tuition, but there were textbooks, car maintenance, insurance, and gas, the occasional coffee or even a splurge on lunch with a friend, and occasionally a new something or other for my wardrobe. By winter, though, it was obvious I was going to need a new pair of boots, and while I'd now be all over that option, at the time I couldn't get excited about spending my hard-earned cash on something so practical. So when my parents asked what I needed/wanted for Christmas, I had a ready answer.

And I knew exactly the style they should get me -- does anyone remember a period in the very early 70s when this shape of boot was everything a teen wanted? We called them mukluks although they're not really a mukluk at all. Trolling the Internet, I've found a picture of a Norwegian boot whose shape is exactly what we were all after. Some friends had ones made of (fake, I think) sealskin, but I was going to be quite content with the nylon fabric version. Of course, these were the silliest boots possible for the wet reality of West Coast winters -- about as practical as putting large sponges on one's feet. But hey, everyone was wearing them . . .

More than the boots, though, what I really, really craved was a radio for my little car. My little Imp (another one, very similar, pictured here, recently the subject of this fond article in Canadian Driver) was fun to drive, what with its Manual Choke, its rear-engine, its funny little hatch-back window (not to mention its relation to the Sunbeam Tiger or Alpine), but it didn't come equipped with radio. Boots and radio would cost about the same, but I knew my parents' Christmas budget limitations, and I knew my request had to be for one or the other. I opted for practicality, but dad knew how tough the choice was for me.

Sure enough, when I opened my gift on Christmas Eve -- we always did our opening then so that Christmas morning could be saved for getting to Mass -- I resignedly but gratefully confronted the much-needed boots, exactly the pair I'd have chosen for myself. I hugged Mom and Dad thanks, then settled down to try the boots on, when Dad reached over and handed me an envelope. Inside was a note I wish I'd saved: In his inimitable print-writing, generally all capital letters, typical of his North England 1930s schooling, was an equally typical goofy rhyme confiding that he might get in trouble with my mom for breaking the budget, but that I should go to the next clue to see what I might discover. I can't remember if there were two or three more envelopes to direct me, but I know I ended up in the side garage at the back of the yard where another gift sat in the seat of my little car.

I can see his grin even now, forty years later, and not simply because it's pictured in the photograph I keep at my desk. His spirit surfaces with every gift I've ever given or received, and ten years after his passing, we miss him often, but especially at Christmas. And while I respect the value of a good budget, well adhered-to (and while I have some feminist sympathies with my poor mother's role in this story), I can't help but think of the MasterCard commercial.
New winter boots: $25 (it was 1970!)
New car radio: $25
Installation of car radio (which, seriously, involved drilling a small hole in the car hood to thread the antenna through, and clamping the radio to the dash): $5
Lifetime memory: Priceless!

Now it's time to share, please . . . which gifts linger in your memory? will any of this year's, given or received, join that number?

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250 F1-SPORT 2011

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250 F1-SPORT 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250 F1-
SPORT RED


MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250 F1-SPORT 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250 F1-
SPORT WHITE

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250 F1-SPORT 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250 F1-
SPORT BLACK

Engine Type Air / Oil cooled 75° V-twin DOHC, 4-valve per cylinder
Displacement 249cc
Bore x Stroke 57 x 48.8
Compression Ratio 10.3 : 1
Fuel System Fuel injection
Lubrication Wet sump
Transmission Clutch Wet, Multiplate
Gear Constant mesh 5-speed (1down 4up)
Final Drive Chain

Chassis Overall Length 82.5in
Overall Height 44.1in
Overall Width 30.7in
Wheel Base 56.5in
Ground Clearance 6.9in
Seat Height 32.7in
Brake F: 300Ø Semi floating single disc, 2 pistons caliper
R: 230Ø Single disc, 2 pistons caliper
Suspension F: 41Ø Upside down Telescopic
R: Swing arm with Progressive linkage Hydraulic Mono shock absorber (Preload adjustable)
Rake/Trail 25 degree/ 3.7in
Tyre F: 110/70 -17 54H / R: 150/70 -17 69H
Fuel Tank Capacity 4.5gal
Wet Weight 375lbs
GVWR 750lbs

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250R FI-SPORT 2011

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250R FI-SPORT 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250R FI
SPORT -
FRONT RIGHT

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250R FI-SPORT 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250R FI
-SPORT BLACK

MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250R FI-SPORT 2011MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250R FI
SPORT-
REAR RIGHT
MOTORCYCLE HYOSUNG GT250R FI-SPORT 2011, NEW, MODELS, SPECIFICATION, ENGINE, CHASSIS, COLOR.
Chassis Overall Length 82.5in
Overall Height 44.3in
Overall Width 28.3in
Wheel Base 56.5in
Ground Clearance 6.1in
Seat Height 32.7in
Brake F: 300Ø Semi floating double discs, 2 pistons calipers
R: 230Ø Single disc, 2 pistons caliper
Suspension F: 41Ø Upside down Telescopic
R: Swing arm with Progressive linkage Hydraulic Mono shock absorber (Preload adjustable)
Rake/Trail 25 degree/ 3.7in
Tyre F: 110/70 -17 54H / R: 150/70 -17 69H
Fuel Tank Capacity 4.5gal
Wet Weight 414lbs
GVWR 750lbs

Engine Type Air / Oil cooled 75° V-twin DOHC, 4-valve per cylinder
Displacement 249cc
Bore x Stroke 57 x 48.8
Compression Ratio 10.3 : 1
Fuel System Fuel injection
Lubrication Wet sump

The Best Kawasaki VN 900 Custom 2011

Bridging the visual Balancing the lightweight look of the front end is a low, wide rear wheel featuring a 180mm tire on a 15-inch cast wheel that gives the rider the feeling of sitting on a one-of-a-kind, made-to-order motorcycle. The wheel features spokes arranged in pairs for a special visual appeal. Perhaps one of the most striking examples of this Vulcan cruiser’s distinctive look is its large-diameter 21-inch front cast wheel – itself somewhat rare in the custom-building world. A massive rear tire, light-looking front end accentuated by a thin 21-inch cast wheel, and sculpted bodywork top the stand-out features of the Vulcan 900 Custom.

Kawasaki engineers and designers concentrated on delivering a motorcycle with a customized appearance typically found only on expensive two-wheel offerings. The 900 Custom’s unique, edgy design shows it can stand out from the crowd. Like its siblings, the Vulcan 900 Custom has a fuel-injected 903cc engine that produces exceptional roll-on acceleration rivaling the get-up-and-go of much larger motorcycles – yet it’s wrapped in a nimble chassis that lets it turn and handle like no heavyweight motorcycle can. These stylish machines have more to offer than just good looks. But you won’t pay big bike bucks to get this affordable middleweight. And the 180-series rear tire, the largest in its class, accentuates its big bike style. Stylish cast wheels, including a solid-look rear wheel, complete the classic V-twin look.  Drawing from both current and classic styling influences, the Vulcan® 900 Custom and Custom Special Edition cruisers are a distinctive mix of back-in-the-day style and up-to-date imagery; an aggressive flat handlebar and forward footpegs place the rider in a stylish profile that enhances the overall visual appeal when rolling down Main Street.

New Kawasaki VN 900 Custom 2011

The essential design of the Vee's shaft drive limits the While the 21 inch almost dangerously skinny front rubber on the Vulcan 900 Custom leads you to wonder whether you'll be kissing the asphalt when you slide out on the next hairpin, the Vulcan 900 Classic LT is provided with an exceptionally meaty 130/90-16 front tire which instills considerable confidence when leaning the V-twin over. Underneath that pile of chromed junk you might as well have a Kubota D600 diesel for all you can see from the right side! Worse than that, if that's possible, the darn thing covers up half of the raison d'etre of the Vulcan 900 Classic LT, the wonderful V-twin jugs which are the primary impetus for these bikes being bought in the first place. It's a bulbous triangular mess with a half formed embryonic chopperish round cover bulging out of it like the Alien from John Hurt's gut.

The mufflers are way too fat and long, the saddlebags cover up the radical hardtail styled rear frame members, and the air cleaner cover is an aberration. The Vulcan 900 Classic LT is, of course, not aesthetically perfect. From the bold chrome structure on the windshield featuring the V logo to the studded leather everything and the exquisite pinstriped two tone paint job that just oozes post-war era, the Vulcan 900 Classic LT is a visual feast.  Unlike a fair amount of its competition (are you listening Honda Shadow 750?) the 2011 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic LT is a truly modern and technologically up to date midsized cruiser which combines essential basic model good looks with the classic Fifties tourer styling clues to end up with an exceptionally tasty and desirable package.

2011 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic LT

It may look the part of chopperized custom, The front 21 inch cast wheel and 80/90x21 tire simply does not provide enough contact patch for a nearly one litre motorcycle. Where the Vulcan 900 Custom Special Edition really comes up short is in the tire department. It's not in the same stump puller league that the late Vulcan 2000 owned, but then again its displacement is less than half of the former Kawasaki two wheeled Caterpillar D9.

The Vulcan 900 Custom Special Edition is propelled down the road by a 903cc liquid-cooled, SOHC, four-valve per cylinder, V-twin which generates a fairly respectable 58.2 foot pounds of torque at a reasonably low 3,500 rpm. It's the best handling of the three (with one gaping exception to follow), as well as the most technologically advanced. Strictly from a riding standpoint, the best choice is the Vulcan 900 Custom Special Edition. If the front wheel and tire looks like it just came off of a 1948 Oldsmobile, then it's either the Honda or the Harley. If it's fairly light and has a motocrosser front wheel, it's the Vulcan 900 Custom Special Edition.

From across a street the only hope you have of identifying the Kawi is by checking out the front end. They're all black on black on black, with highlights in… black! You could certainly be excused for wondering how to tell these virtual clones apart, as the paint job is certainly not going to give you any hints. Now which one is which?

Look, it's a 2011 Harley Davidson Sportster Forty Eight, and right next to it is a 2011 Honda Shadow Phantom, and next to that is a 2011 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Custom Special Edition!

Hyperflo Exhaust Systems For Honda CBR 600RR

Even the videos on YouTube don't fully capture the deep full sound that is Hyperflo. It is something that is hard to put into words and can only be fully appreciated by actually hearing it. Engineered to perform well inside and out the Hyperflo exhaust will capture the attention of all who hear it and feel it. The sound is simply unbelievable and once heard seems to lodge itself in one's self conscience with the intense desire to own one or the gratification that you do.

After all, a big part of the reason we ride the bike is to capture attention and this exhaust does that very well. Perhaps at the top of the list will be the attempt to describe the incredible unique sound that these exhausts create. Just ask any Hyperflo owner and you will hear all about the great features that make this exhaust a favorite. In many ways it offers something that no other aftermarket exhaust can offer. Part of the attention is coming from the look of the exhaust with it's smooth design and the multiple options for finishes and tips.

There is no denying that Hyperflo will be a major player in the aftermarket exhaust arena. Those who have experienced them are quick to step up and defend the exhaust when others who are not familiar spout foolishness about them. There has been quite a buzz surrounding these exhausts and their popularity has grown rapidly due to the performance and design.  It's been a few years now since Hyperflo entered the field for quality aftermarket exhaust systems for the Honda CBR 600RR and 1000RR bikes.