Wednesday, December 15, 2010

MOTORCYCYCLE YAMAHA VMAX (VMAX17) 2011

MOTORCYCYCLE YAMAHA VMAX (VMAX17) MOTORCYCLE YAMAHA VMAX(VMAX17)


MOTORCYCYCLE YAMAHA VMAX (VMAX17) YAMAHA VMAX(VMAX17) BLACK

MOTORCYCYCLE YAMAHA VMAX (VMAX17) YAMAHA VMAX(VMAX17) RED

MOTORCYCYCLE YAMAHA VMAX (VMAX17)NEW, MODELS, SPECIFICATIONS, MANUFACTURER.
Engine
Type 102-cubic-inch (1679cc) liquid-cooled 65° V-4, DOHC, 4 valves/cylinder
Bore x Stroke 90.0mm x 66.0mm
Compression Ratio 11.3:1
Fuel Delivery Fuel Injection with YCC-T and YCC-I
Ignition TCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition
Transmission 5-speed, multiplate slipper clutch
Final Drive Shaft

MOTORCYCLE YAMAHA YZF R6 2011

MOTORCYCLE YAMAHA YZF R6 2011MOTORCYCLE YAMAHA YZF R6 BLUE


MOTORCYCLE YAMAHA YZF R6 2011 YAMAHA YZF R6 RED

MOTORCYCLE YAMAHA YZF R6 2011 YAMAHA YZF R6 BLACK

MOTORCYCLE YAMAHA YZF R6 2011 NEW, MODELS, SPECIFICATION, MANUFACTURER
Engine Liquid-cooled, DOHC, 16-valve (titanium), in-line four
Displacement 599 cc
Bore and Stroke 67 x 42.5 mm
Compression Ratio 13.1:1
Maximum Torque 6.6 kg-m (47.7 ft-lb) @ 11,500 rpm
Engine Management YCC-T & YCC-I
Fuel Delivery 41 mm Mikuni throttle body F.I.
Estimated Fuel Consumption* 17kpl / 48mpg (Imp.)
Lubrication Wet sump
Ignition / Starting TCI / Electric
Transmission 6-speed
Final Drive O-ring chain

MOTORCYCLE VICTORY CROSS ROADS 2011

MOTORCYCLE VICTORY CROSS ROADS VICTORY CROSS ROADS RED


MOTORCYCLE VICTORY CROSS ROADS
VICTORY CROSS ROADS ROAD SHOW
MOTORCYCLE VICTORY CROSS ROADS
VICTORY CROSS ROADS BLACK

MOTORCYCLE VICTORY CROSS ROADS 2011, NEW, MODELS, SPECIFICATION, MANUFACTURER.

Chassis Dimensions
Length 104.4 in / 2652 mm
Wheelbase 65.7 in / 1670 mm
Seat Height 26.25 in / 667 mm
Ground Clearance 5.8 in / 148 mm
Rake/trail 29.0o / 5.6 in / 142 mm
Dry Weight 745 Lbs / 338 Kg
GVWR 1360 lbs / 618 kg

Engine
Engine Type 4-stroke
50o V-Twin
Cooling System Air / oil
Displacement 106 ci / 1731 cc
Bore x Stroke 101 x 108 mm
Compression ratio 9.4 : 1
Valve train Single overhead camshafts with 4 valves per cylinder, self-adjusting cam chains, hydraulic lifters
Fuel System Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45mm throttle body
Fuel Capacity 5.8 gal / 22 ltr
Exhaust Split dual exhaust with crossover
Oil capacity 5.0 qts / 4.75 ltr
Charging System 38 amps max output
Battery 12 volts / 18 amp hours
Primary Drive Gear drive with torque compensator
Clutch Wet, multi-plate
Transmission 6-speed overdrive constant mesh
Final Drive Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt

MOTORCYCLE TRIUMPH DAYTONA 675 2011

MOTORCYCLE TRIUMPH DAYTONA 675TRIUMPH DAYTONA 675 ROAD SHOW


MOTORCYCLE TRIUMPH DAYTONA 675TRIUMPH DAYTONA 675 BLACK

MOTORCYCLE TRIUMPH DAYTONA 675TRIUMPH DAYTONA 675 RED
MOTORCYCLE TRIUMPH DAYTONA 675TRIUMPH DAYTONA 675 BLUE

MOTORCYCLE TRIUMPH DAYTONA 675 2011,MODELs, SPECIFICATIONS, MANUFACTURER.
Engine and Transmission
Type Liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder
Capacity 675cc
Bore/Stroke 74.0 x 52.3mm
Fuel System Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection with forced air induction and SAI Exhaust Stainless steel 3 into 1 system with valve in secondary and under seat silencer Final Drive O ring chain
Clutch Wet, multi-plate Gearbox 6-speed, close ratio
Oil Capacity 3.5 litres (0.9 US gals) Chassis, Running Gear and Displays
Frame Aluminium beam twin spar Swingarm Braced, twin-sided, aluminium alloy with adjustable pivot position
Wheel Front Cast aluminium alloy 5-spoke 17 x 3.5in
Rear Cast aluminium alloy 5-spoke 17 x 5.5in
Tyre Front 120/70 ZR 17
Rear 180/55 ZR 17
Engine: Liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder
Frame: Aluminium beam twin spar
Rear Suspension: Kayaba monoshock with piggy back reservoir adjustable for preload, rebound and high/low speed compression damping, 130mm rear wheel travel
Instruments: LCD multi-functional instrument pack with digital speedometer, trip computer, analogue tachometer, lap timer, gear position indicator and programmable gear change lights

Rear Brakes : Single 220mm disc, Nissin single piston caliper
- Class-leading, award-winning, supersport contender
- Race track developed technology
- Ultra-compact 125PS, 72Nm three-cylinder engine for class-leading performance
- Fully-adjustable suspension for controllable and precise handling
- Monobloc caliper brakes deliver outstanding power and feel
- Wide range of performance accessories available
- Two year unlimited mileage warranty as standard

Keeping the Grinch Out of Christmas . . .



Because I was a stay-at-home mom (albeit one who ran a music studio from home, teaching piano and theory, while also a perennial student) whose husband was often away, I did most of our Christmas prep for most of our married life. Christmas cards in the early decades, baking, grocery-shopping, gift-making and gift-buying, outfitting each child with a Christmas outfit, often handsewn. Although Pater has always been very helpful and very competent with kids and kitchens and laundry, etc., he so often seemed to be somewhere he couldn't get home from until the 22nd, so I either picked out the tree myself or, more often, came up with good reasons for saving the Christmas-decorating until after that date. Some years, depending on what schools the kids were at, there would be four separate evenings devoted to band recitals and Christmas concerts besides the Christmas piano recitals I'd host for my students. You know the drill, I'm sure. You've either been there or you still are.


Eight or nine years ago, Pater was working in Ottawa, flying home every three weeks or so, unless I flew out there; we still had one teen at home, the other three gone but planning to return for Christmas, some with partners. Driving back from Victoria (where I was teaching a class and completing my doctorate), radio tuned to CBC for the 90-minute drive, I heard an entertaining radio play -- or perhaps just a short story read aloud -- about a 60-ish woman overwhelmed with all the preparations for the perfect Christmas her adult daughters were expecting her to produce yet again. Something about the recitation -- the long grocery list for the turkey dinner itself; all the baking ingredients to haul home and transform through hours of labour into the shortbread and butter tarts; the trip out to the special shop that sold the perfect Christmas crackers for each dinner guest; the tree itself which must, the daughters insisted, be live; the decorations that required hauling out the ladder and sifting through dusty boxes.

The story's twist was that the protagonist realized she didn't want to do all of this anymore and that she didn't need to -- if I remember correctly, she left a message for her daughters with instructions about how to replicate the perfect Christmas of their childhood -- and she skipped off to the tropical holiday of her own dreams.

I love having all of mine home for the holidays, and they're all great house guests, nowhere near as demanding as the daughters in the CBC story. But I was feeling burdened by the expectations I had set up, and that story liberated me. The academic year sets December up as a month of heavy marking -- by the time I have time freed up, the stores are packed and the trees are picked over. Besides which, we're car-free by choice on our little island, so once we get gifts, tree, decorations, and groceries off the boat, they have to be wheel-barrowed or back-packed or biked to the house. Pater got home two days before Christmas, and we needed to be ready to feed eight people for days -- bags and bags and bags of groceries. I was exhausted simply at the thought. The tree, at that point, seemed like a burden rather than a celebration.

So inspired by the story I'd heard, I let everyone in the family know that I wasn't doing the traditional tree anymore. Instead, I found a large arbutus limb on the beach -- the arbutus is my favourite tree, stunning with its red bark peeling away to reveal the green beneath -- with many branches for Pater to string white mini-lights along. I filled several glass bowls with the old tree's multi-coloured lights and plugged those in for some extra festive glow and savoured the simplicity.

I also simplified the gift list considerably and cut back on some of the baking. Otherwise, though, we retained the elements we enjoyed the most -- good food, music, some decent bottles, and great company.

When I first put that Driftwood tree up, I said I'd wait until I WANTED to go back to a traditional tree, if ever. I recognized that many of the expectations I had begun grumbling about were ones I'd created and nurtured. Indeed, none of my kids ever complained about the change and for eight or nine years now, we haven't even missed that great fir smell or those gradually-acquired, long-treasured ornaments.

But this year is Nola's third Christmas, the first one she has language for and can really participate in meaningfully. And since her parents are coming to our place on the 23rd, we're it for the Christmas tree. For the first time in a long while, I really wanted to put up a traditional tree and bring out all the ornaments of our almost 35 36 plus (time flies when you're having this much fun, I even got my numbers wrong!) years of family life. Pater concurred and happily prepared to resume his long-abandoned post as chief tree-fetcher.

Then, as you might remember, all this joyous new resolution was interrupted by the nastiness of septic problems compounding my confinement to a stack of not-always-inspiring first-year papers to be marked. The repair guy was so busy that I spent most of the week waiting at home in case he was able to make it that day. With only myself at home (somehow, the pump uncannily intuits Pater's absence and generally saves its breakdowns for such times), I was nonetheless surprised at how much "grey water" one body can use, as I carried it outside to splash sudsily in one corner of the garden or other. When the seized motor was finally replaced (under warranty, thank heaven for small favours!) by mid-Friday, there was a mountain of unwashed laundry, a dishwasher of dirty dishes, and a house generally in need of a good scrub. Not a day to be excited about a Christmas tree.

But it had arrived, and we hauled out the long-stored boxes. Over the next few days I may show you some of the ornaments and tell you about the memories they carried. For now, I will just say that the smell of fir in the house, the glow of white lights against dark green branches, the carefully placed (kitsch at the back of the tree, please) baubles, angels, hand-embroidered and smocked and tatted treasures . . . the wonderful totality of a Christmas tree for me at this particular stage of my life . . . well, it was worth turning away from the obligation for almost a decade in order to so newly and richly appreciate the privilege and luxury and joy. And that's without even seeing it through Nola's eyes yet.

Anyway, as I savoured the tree's appearance after such a challenging and chaotic week, a few lines from a favourite children's book, Mog's Christmas, sprang to mind. Sadly, my copy seems to be missing from our stack of Christmas children's books and will be replaced, for Nola, at the next visit to Vancouver Kids Books. Meanwhile, though, I tracked down the lines I was thinking of. Mog, a rather particular cat, has been much disturbed by the disruptive Christmas preparations around her home, most especially by what appears, from her perspective, to be a walking tree. She escapes, experiences another calamity, but finally, thankfully, she is found and rescued by her family and . . .

Then everything was lovely. The whole house was lovely. The tree had stopped walking about and made itself all pretty. And Mog had three boiled eggs and some turkey and a present to unwrap. “Happy Christmas, Mog,” said Debbie.
I look forward to sharing more about my tree ornaments and about children's Christmas books and favourite gifts from the past and what I wear and maybe even a favourite recipe or two. I'd love you to share as well. . . .some of that is already happening around the Blogosphere (Tish at A Femme d'un Certain Age has been hosting a lovely series of holiday posts you will love). Do you put a Christmas tree up? Is it decorated already? And what's your favourite decoration or decorating trick of the moment? Most importantly, how do you balance between obligation and joy? how do you maintain a sense of what really matters over the holidays?

Ducati Offers 2011 Review, Price,Feature

Ducati Offers 2011 Review, Price,Feature
In response to feedback from motorcycle show visitors, Ducati is pleased to announce the addition of a stunning diamond black color scheme for the new 2011 Ducati Diavel.

With the Diavel receiving consumer attention at motorcycle shows around the globe, Ducati collected feedback from passionate motorcyclists viewing the bike for the first time. The new diamond black color option is the result of immediate response to customer demand.

Suspension on the 796 consists of an inverted, non-adjustable 43mm Showa fork and a Sachs shock adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping – similar to that on the Monster 696. The Monster 1100’s 43mm inverted Showa fork is fully adjustable while its Sachs shock offers the same range of adjustments found on the 696 and 796.

Scrubbing speed on the 796 is the work of dual four-piston radial-mount Brembo calipers grabbing 320mm discs; a two-pot Brembo squeezes a 245mm disc out back. This is essentially the same system utilized on the 696 and 1100, save for the use of a radial-pump master cylinder on the biggest Monster.

Standard niceties for the middle child Monster include an attractive “micro bikini” windscreen, four-way adjustable clutch and brake levers and a pillion seat cover.

Press materials for the 796 eagerly highlight its 31.5-inch seat height is 0.4 inch lower than the 1100’s saddle, and that the 796’s tapered handlebar sits 0.8-inch higher than the bigger Monster’s bar. These changes, says Ducati, are made in response to Monster customers’ requests. In fairness to the 696 we figured we’d let you know its seat is 30.3 inches off the ground.

Spesification

Base Price: $9,995 (ABS $10,995)

Warranty: 2 yrs., unltd. miles

Website: www.ducatiusa.com

ENGINE

Type: Air-cooled, transverse, 90-degree L-twin

Displacement: 803cc

Bore x Stroke: 88.0 x 66.0mm

Compression Ratio: 11.0:1

Valve Train: Desmodromic, 2 valves per cyl.

Valve Adj. Interval: 7,500 miles

Fuel Delivery: Electronic fuel injection, 45mm throttle bodies x 2

Lubrication System: Wet sump, 3.1-qt. cap.

Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated wet clutch

Final Drive: O-ring chain

ELECTRICAL

Ignition: Electronic

Charging Output: 480 watts max.

Battery: 12V 10AH

CHASSIS

Frame: Tubular-steel trellis w/ cast seat subframe & single-sided swingarm

Wheelbase: 57.1 in.

Rake/Trail: 24 degrees/3.43 in.

Seat Height: 31.5 in.

Suspension, Front: 43mm male-slider fork, no adj., 4.7-in. travel

Rear: Single shock, adj. for spring preload and rebound damping, 5.8-in. travel

Brakes, Front: Dual semi-floating discs w/ opposed 4-piston calipers

Rear: Single disc w/ opposed 2-piston caliper

Wheels, Front: Cast, 3.50 x 17 in.

Rear: Cast, 5.50 x 17 in.

Tires, Front: 120/70-ZR17

Rear: 180/55-ZR17

Wet Weight: 415 lbs.

Load Capacity: 445 lbs.

GVWR: 860 lbs.

PERFORMANCE

Fuel Capacity: 3.8 gals., last 0.8 gal. warning light on

MPG: 91 octane recommended (high/avg/low) 45.3/45.2/44.9

Estimated Range: 172 miles

Indicated rpm at 60 mph: 3,400

MOTORCYCLE SUZUKI GSX1250FA 2011

MOTORCYCLE SUZUKI GSX12550FAMOTORCYCLE SUZUKI GSX1250FA LEFT SIDE

MOTORCYCLE SUZUKI GSX12550FAMOTORCYCLE SUZUKI GSX1250FA BLACK

MOTORCYCLE SUZUKI GSX12550FASUZUKI GSX1250FA RIGHT SIDE

MOTORCYCLE SUZUKI GSX12550FA
MOTORCYCLE SUZUKI GSX1250FA

MOTORCYCLE SUZUKI GSX1250FA 2011, new, model, models Specifications, manufacturer
Engine:
Engine 1255cc, 4-stroke, liquid-cooled, DOHC
Bore Stroke 79.0 mm x 64.0 mm
Compression Ratio 10.5 : 1
Fuel System Fuel Injection
Ignition Electronic ignition (Transistorized)
Lubrication Wet sump
Starter Electric

Chassis:
Brakes Front Disc brake, twin
Brakes Rear Disc brake
Curb Weight 257kg (567 lbs.)
Final Drive RK GB50GSVZ3, 118 links
Fuel Tank Capacity 18.5 L (4.9 US gal)
Ground Clearance 5.3 in. (135mm)
Overall Length 2130 mm (83.9 in.)
Overall Width 790 mm (28.0 in.)
Seat Height 805/825 mm (31.7/32.5 in.) - Low/High
Suspension Front Telescopic, coil spring, oil damped
Suspension Rear Link type, coil spring, oil damped
Tires Front 120/70ZR17M/C (58W), tubeless
Tires Rear 180/55ZR17M/C (73W), tubeless
Transmission 6-speed, constant mesh
Wheelbase 1485mm (58.5 in.)